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For Dr. Barber, it is all about comfort.

Informed Consent in Psychotherapy & Counseling:

A lot of women who have been raped will want to see a female therapist, they're more comfortable with that. Is that better for them, will it make a difference? There's no real evidence. But the fact is that that's what you want, what will get you to therapy — why question it?

If you have a strong preference, then go with it.

Professional Resources: Why are Evidence-Based Practices Important in Mental Health?

According to the American Psychological Association APA , the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HIPAA dictates a national standard of privacy that protects patients' medical records and health information — meaning, what you say to your therapist or psychiatrist really does stay between you and your therapist or psychiatrist.

This is especially a relief for people who share a therapist with family members, friends, or co-workers. But there are exceptions: the law requires a psychologist to share your information, with or without your consent, if she believes you pose a risk to yourself or others; if she's made aware of ongoing domestic abuse or neglect; or — in an extreme and unlikely case — if she receives a court order for it. If you use insurance to pay for your therapy, the insurance company will receive information about diagnosis and treatment, but they are also bound by the same HIPAA confidentiality rules.

Of course, these rights are as they apply to adults; laws for minors vary more state by state, but often parents, patients, and therapists will work together to agree on terms of privacy. Regular meetings and intimate, confidential conversation can make one's relationship with their therapist feel, at times, like friendship, but professionals caution against confusing the two. However, she says: "This relationship is professional and should remain so even after termination — the therapist is not the client's best friend.

It's important to maintain boundaries, for both parties, says Barber. They should be invested in you for your own good, not their own needs. That's what's important. It's important to remember that therapists and counselors are first and foremost human beings, and by extension, neither all-knowing nor infallible.

Just because a person is a therapist, doesn't mean he's a good one — but what does a bad therapist look like? The answer, of course, isn't completely universal, but there are some red flags.


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If you feel like the boundary of professionalism isn't being upheld — say, your therapist talks too much about his own life; passes judgment on your lifestyle or habits; touches you without your consent; is confrontational or argumentative; blurs the therapist-patient relationship by becoming too friendly, suggesting social activities, or leaning on your professional skills for example, if you're a tutor, your therapist shouldn't ask you to come by and help his son prep for the SATs — it means you aren't getting what you need, and there's no reason to stick around to see if it gets better.

But if you're feeling more generally uncomfortable, or unsure that your treatment is actually helping, bring that up in your session. A good way to gauge the quality of the care you're getting is to be direct about any concerns you have and see how your therapist reacts. Your relationship with your therapist, like any relationship, is one that requires a lot of effort and emotional energy. Naturally, therapist breakups can be hard. If you want to stop seeing them because you are dissatisfied with their service, it is perfectly appropriate to say, "I don't think this is working" and move on , says Lindau — and conversely, "for the therapist to say, I don't think this is the right time for you to do this type of treatment.

In other cases, you may have been seeing a therapist for a long time and need to move, or your therapist may tell you that he thinks you don't need to see him anymore. These kinds of situations can be difficult because these relationships can be a big part of our lives, and it may be hard to let them go.

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Group Therapy - Mode of Therapy | tiaberoci.tk

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Mental health care and Medicare

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How therapy and counseling can help

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